Guerrilla Blog Dispatches – June 5, 2013

Manning

Manning Trial Shrouded in Secrecy and Security

Hacker Testifies That Manning Never Talked About Aiding Enemy

UN Accuses Rebels and Regime of War Crimes

Afghans Demand Arrest of US Troops Over Killings

British Soldiers Punished for Abusing Afghan Civilians

Photo: Accused WikiLeak Source Bradley Manning.

This Week in War

Syriathepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

This round-up will be on hiatus the next two weeks (sorry), but will return! 

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Free Syrian Army fighters sit in a house on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria. (Photo by Khalil Hamra)

UN Calls for Global Moratorium on Killer Robots

The United Nations Human Rights Commission released a report calling for the suspension on the “testing, production, assembly, transfer, accusation, deployment and use” of killer robots. Some nations across the world have been using machines to carry out military missions, and within the past few years the US government has increased its drone usage to target enemy combatants abroad. Many critics of the use of robots believe that the rise of the machines could be a global threat to the safety of people everywhere.

UN Approves Global Arms Trade Treaty

BulletsAfter years of negotiations and an intense lobbying effort by weapons manufacturers and their allies, the United Nations approved the world’s most sweeping global arms trade treaty. By a the 154 to 3 vote the General Assembly approved the Arms Trade Treaty, with 23 abstentions from countries with problematic human rights records including Bahrain, Myanmar and Sri Lanka. Activists see it as a human rights victory that will prevent future violence and genocides:

Although implementation is years away and there is no specific enforcement mechanism, proponents say the treaty would for the first time force sellers to consider how their customers will use the weapons and to make that information public. The goal is to curb the sale of weapons that kill tens of thousands of people every year — by, for example, making it harder for Russia to argue that its arms deals with Syria are legal under international law.

The treaty, which took seven years to negotiate, reflects growing international sentiment that the multibillion-dollar weapons trade needs to be held to a moral standard. The hope is that even nations reluctant to ratify the treaty will feel public pressure to abide by its provisions. The treaty calls for sales to be evaluated on whether the weapons will be used to break humanitarian law, foment genocide or war crimes, abet terrorism or organized crime or slaughter women and children.

Read more here.

This Week in War

Aleppothepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

Please take a moment to register your support for A Day Without News, a just-launched initiative to address the targeting of journalists in armed conflict. The launch marks the anniversary of the deaths of Marie Colvin and Rémi Ochlik.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Ramallah, West Bank. Palestinian protesters demonstrating in solidarity with four hunger striking prisoners in Ofer shield themselves with a car seat during clashes with Israeli soldiers. Bernat Armangue/AP.