This Week in War

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Kabul, Afghanistan. An Afghan soldier stands guard at the presidential palace on June 25th following a Taliban attack. Shah Merai/AFP/Getty

This Week in War

Mideast Syriathepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

This round-up will be on hiatus next Friday, but will return! 

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Iraq War Drumbeat: World Pushes Back Against America’s March to War

War ProtestsFebruary 11, 2003

Inter Press Service:

Transatlantic relations faced an unprecedented row Monday – with France spearheading efforts to slow the march to a U.S.-led war against Iraq.

Transatlantic relations faced an unprecedented row Monday – with France spearheading efforts to slow the march to a U.S.-led war against Iraq.

In a spectacular move, France, Russia and Germany called for strengthened United Nations weapons inspections in Iraq, aimed at peacefully disarming that country.

In another significant move Monday, France joined Belgium and Germany in refusing to support any NATO protection for Turkey in the event of an attack on Iraq.

The three countries said a decision ahead of the Security Council meeting next Friday, would constitute a “logic for war” and a failure for diplomacy.

U.S. Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said Washington would go ahead with plans to boost Turkey’s defenses in advance of a possible war with Iraq despite objections from the three NATO allies.

CNN:

The British public believes the United States and North Korea are bigger threats to world peace than Iraq, a survey released on Tuesday shows.

Despite the global drama surrounding Iraq, three out of four Britons no longer see it as a major danger, according to the Channel 4 News poll.

The percentage of people who see Iraq as a threat has fallen to 23 percent from 40 percent in November.

Meanwhile, concern over North Korea, which has said it is resurrecting its nuclear weapons program, increased from 4 percent to 27 percent.

The perception of danger from the United States grew from 27 percent to 32 percent.

A majority, 61 percent, said they were convinced Iraq possesses banned weapons and that steps should be taken to keep them from falling into the hands of terrorists.

About the same percentage of respondents, 62 percent, said they would support the use of force against Iraq if a majority of U.N. Security Council members voted for it.

Half of the people survey said a war against Iraq would be wrong because of the loss of Iraqi civilian lives.

US Sparks Global Arms Race for Drones

EQ-4 Global Hawk First LaunchOver the past several years, the headlines have been filled with news drone strike after drone strike in Afghanistan or Pakistan. The extrajudicial targeted assassination of alleged terrorist leaders has become almost a daily occurrence. The Obama Administration has also expanded the so-called War on Terror through the use of drones to conduct shadow wars in places such as Yemen and Somalia. The President and others in his administration has defended the use of drones, but will they have the same attitude if other countries use them in the same way? We may soon find out as a global arms race for drone technology has begun:

The number of countries that have acquired or developed drones expanded to more than 75, up from about 40 in 2005, according to the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress. Iran and China are among the countries that have fielded their own systems.

“People have seen the successes we’ve had,” said Lt. Gen. Larry James, the Air Force’s deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

Israeli aircraft recently shot down an Iranian-made drone launched by Hezbollah that had penetrated Israeli airspace. Hezbollah is a U.S.-designated terror group supported by Iran that has fought wars with Israel and carried out attacks on U.S. personnel.

Pakistan is attempting to acquire an armed drone system, apparently with help from China, according to IHS Janes, a security research firm.

The U.S. State Department and Defense Department control exports of U.S. drone technology and equipment, and the United States has rejected requests from a growing number of countries seeking drone technology. Israel has sold drone equipment to India, Russia and Georgia, according to the GAO.

Some analysts contend that nations seek the drones as much for the clout they bring as any military utility they provide, since few countries have the sophisticated sensors or precision weapons that the United States employs.

Read more here.

Photo: U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Rob Donnelly from the 380th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron conducts pre-flight checks on an EQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle before its first launch from an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia (Photo via U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Eric Harris).