This Week in War

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Kabul, Afghanistan. An Afghan soldier stands guard at the presidential palace on June 25th following a Taliban attack. Shah Merai/AFP/Getty

Advertisements

This Week in War

Syriathepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

This round-up will be on hiatus the next two weeks (sorry), but will return! 

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Photo: Free Syrian Army fighters sit in a house on the outskirts of Aleppo, Syria. (Photo by Khalil Hamra)

This Week in War

Mideast Syriathepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism. Subscribe here to receive this round-up by email.

This round-up will be on hiatus next Friday, but will return! 

If you would like to receive this round-up as a weekly email, you can sign up through this form, or email me directly at torierosedeghett@gmail.com.

Guerrilla Blog Dispatches – February 21, 2013

Helo

Senator Lists the Death Toll From U.S. Drones at 4,700 People

DHS Working Group to Consider Privacy Impact of Drones

China Now Considering Drone Strikes in Its Drug War

China Drone Threat Highlights New Global Arms Race

FBI File on Aaron Swartz Reveals Physical Surveillance

Photo: Lynx helicopter lands at FOB Minden at forward operating base close to the Shalamcheh land border crossing at the Iraq-Iran border. (Photo by world_armies)

US Sparks Global Arms Race for Drones

EQ-4 Global Hawk First LaunchOver the past several years, the headlines have been filled with news drone strike after drone strike in Afghanistan or Pakistan. The extrajudicial targeted assassination of alleged terrorist leaders has become almost a daily occurrence. The Obama Administration has also expanded the so-called War on Terror through the use of drones to conduct shadow wars in places such as Yemen and Somalia. The President and others in his administration has defended the use of drones, but will they have the same attitude if other countries use them in the same way? We may soon find out as a global arms race for drone technology has begun:

The number of countries that have acquired or developed drones expanded to more than 75, up from about 40 in 2005, according to the Government Accountability Office, the investigative arm of Congress. Iran and China are among the countries that have fielded their own systems.

“People have seen the successes we’ve had,” said Lt. Gen. Larry James, the Air Force’s deputy chief of staff for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance.

Israeli aircraft recently shot down an Iranian-made drone launched by Hezbollah that had penetrated Israeli airspace. Hezbollah is a U.S.-designated terror group supported by Iran that has fought wars with Israel and carried out attacks on U.S. personnel.

Pakistan is attempting to acquire an armed drone system, apparently with help from China, according to IHS Janes, a security research firm.

The U.S. State Department and Defense Department control exports of U.S. drone technology and equipment, and the United States has rejected requests from a growing number of countries seeking drone technology. Israel has sold drone equipment to India, Russia and Georgia, according to the GAO.

Some analysts contend that nations seek the drones as much for the clout they bring as any military utility they provide, since few countries have the sophisticated sensors or precision weapons that the United States employs.

Read more here.

Photo: U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Rob Donnelly from the 380th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron conducts pre-flight checks on an EQ-4 Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle before its first launch from an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia (Photo via U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Eric Harris).